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From 1967 to Now: Another Town Poised to Take Action

The 1967 Masters golf tournament, won by Gay Brewer, right, was the first time the Augusta National Country Club appeared in full color on television.

The 1967 Masters golf tournament, won by Gay Brewer, right, was the first time the Augusta National Country Club appeared in full color on television.

Did you know the lawn chemical industry can be traced to the second weekend of April of 1967? That’s the weekend the “Augusta Syndrome” was born, causing grown men across the U.S. to covet perfectly manicured green lawns of their own. The picture, at left, shows a young Jack Nicklaus fitting Gay Brewer with his green jacket after Brewer won the tournament that had been broadcast live and in color for the first time.

Detailing the efforts of a town to ban synthetic weed killers on town property, this article appeared with that golf tidbit in the lead on Thursday in the Forecaster, a Maine newspaper, incidently, where I began my career as a gardening columnist nearly 20 years ago:
http://www.theforecaster.net/content/s-scarborough-pesticides-policy-090211. The town of Scarborough, Maine, plans to screen the film, A Chemical Reaction on Sept. 14 at 6:30 p.m. at the Scarborough Public Library. The film tells the story of Hudson, Quebec, that became the first town in North America to ban pesticides 20 years ago.

About The Author

Paul Tukey

An international leader of the green movement, Mr. Tukey is a journalist, author, filmmaker, TV host, activist and award-winning public speaker, who is widely recognized as North America's leading advocate for landscape sustainability and toxic pesticide reduction strategies.

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